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Why You Should Consider a Career as a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist

Nurse in scrubs and face mask in a hospital setting
Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists play a vital role in every surgical team. In your role as a CRNA, you will bring exceptional communication abilities, top-notch patient care, and advanced scientific expertise to every case, which may span various disciplines. If you value face-to-face human interaction, independent decision-making, career opportunity and advancement, and the need for quick problem-solving skills, then beocming a CRNA might be the nursing speciality for you.
Nursing Specialty Finder

Why You Should Consider a Career as a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist

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Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists play a vital role in every surgical team. In your role as a CRNA, you will bring exceptional communication abilities, top-notch patient care, and advanced scientific expertise to every case, which may span various disciplines. If you value face-to-face human interaction, independent decision-making, career opportunity and advancement, and the need for quick problem-solving skills, then beocming a CRNA might be the nursing speciality for you.
Nurse in scrubs and face mask in a hospital setting
  • Direct interaction and impact on patients' lives

    CRNAs are constantly hands-on and working directly with patients. They are also responsible for acquiring proper patient medical history, assessing vitals and responses, administering proper dosages, and answering any questions throughout the duration of a patient's medical care.

  • Exciting fast-paced environment

    Because of the broad range of medical situations that might require any level of anesthetic, CRNAs must be able to react and make decisions quickly in a variety of demanding conditions. Also, because CRNAs often act as the liaison between patients and their leading care provider, CRNAs need to quickly answer questions, relay information, and communicate potential risks to all parties involved.

  • Job satisfaction rates among CRNAs are high

    CRNAs generally report high job satisfaction due to their autonomous roles, intellectual stimulation from challenging work, and opportunities for career advancement. The flexibility in scheduling contributes to a good work-life balance, while continuous learning and teamwork in healthcare settings add to their professional fulfillment. Their significant impact on patient care also provides a deep sense of satisfaction.

  • Average salaries are usually higher for CRNAs than for other nursing specialties

    Because CRNAs require extra schooling, a more advanced skill set, and are highly involved in the care process, they are often just as highly compensated. States with the most highly paid CRNAs can be found here.

  • High degree of autonomy and independence

    CRNAs must be comfortable with independent thinking, especially when emergencies arise. Within both hospitals and smaller medical offices, CRNAs often work alone and are heavily relied upon to create individual care structures that work best for them, the doctors they're working with, and their individual patients. As mentioned, some states allow CRNAs to practice independently, without supervision of a registered physician.

  • Maintain a routine schedule

    Following a set routine is critical for CRNAs in order to best anticipate and prepare for every situation thrown at them in a given day.

  • The worklife of a CRNA is most often varied

    Because they’re often asked to work across a variety of surgical cases and specialties, no two days are the same for a CRNA. Cases, patient personalities and day-to-day colleagues change regularly, so it’s extremely important for CRNAs to be adaptable, highly communicative, and quick thinkers.

    Woman in scrubs an hairnet about to receive anesthetics
    Everything you need to know about becoming a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA), which includes the crucial role of administering anesthesia and providing anesthesia-related care to manage patients pain before, during, and after surgery.

Group of smiling nurses in scrubs holding folders
Group of smiling nurses in scrubs holding folders
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