Rural Nurse

A Rural Nurse helps patients living in geographically and culturally isolated areas, who may have limited access to healthcare.
Required education
ADN or BSN
Average annual salary
Attributes
Independent
Managerial
Out-of-hospital
Patient-facing
Varied
You’ll be skilled in all areas of nursing, with the ability to serve as the primary caregiver of a whole community.
What you’ll do
What you’ll do

Assessment

You’ll evaluate and diagnose patients with a wide variety of ailments.

Education

You’ll teach people about health and wellness.

Interaction

You’ll likely develop close relationships with the people of the communities you work in.

Management

You’ll be in charge of managing supplies and resources within a community.

Treatment

You’ll treat a wide variety or illnesses and injuries and may be adept at critical care, trauma, labor, and delivery.

Where you’ll work
  • Community clinics
  • Doctors’ offices
  • Hospitals
  • Mobile health center
How to become a Rural Nurse

02

Pass the NCLEX-RN and work as a Registered Nurse.

03

Get your Rural Nurse Board Certification through the American Nurses Credentialing Center

04

You’re ready to work as a Rural Nurse.

Nurse-Perspective-DN.jpg
Nurses Leading Innovation
In many isolated areas around the United States, nurses play a significant role in ensuring rural communities have access to quality healthcare. Rural nurses typically work in critical care nursing, trauma, labor and delivery, as well as in typical nursing duties like attending to patients who are sick or injured.
2017-07-26T04:00:00Z
A Camp Nurse’s role is also managerial.
An Occupational Health Nurse is another type of community nurse.
This site uses cookies as described in our Cookie Policy . Please click the "Accept" button or continue to use our site if you agree to our use of cookies