Nursing Specialties

There are various types of nursing, each with its own distinct focus and requirements. Different types of nurses include registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs), and certified nursing assistants (CNAs). Nursing specialties can range from pediatrics to oncology, and require specialized training and education to provide expert care in their respective areas.
Nurse wearing a mask and looking through a microscope

I’m looking for

with

and

with

18 Specialties

Ambulatory Care Nurse
An Ambulatory Care Nurse provides pain management and general health education to patients, in non-emergency situations, outside of a hospital environment.
Camp Nurse
A Camp Nurse takes care of people at camps and retreats that are often located far from a hospital or healthcare facility.
Developmental Disability Nurse
A Developmental Disability or Special Needs Nurse takes care of patients with intellectual or developmental disabilities, such as Down Syndrome and Autism.
Flight Nurse
A Flight or Transport Nurse takes care of patients who are being taken to hospitals or trauma centers on civilian and military aircrafts.
Gastroenterology Nurse
A Gastroenterology or Endoscopy Nurse works with patients who have illnesses or disorders related to the digestive system or gastrointestinal tract.
Gerontological Nurse Practitioner
A Gerontological Nurse Practitioner is a multi-disciplined primary healthcare provider who helps patients manage the physical, mental, and social effects of aging.
Holistic Nurse
A Holistic Nurse uses medical knowledge plus complementary, alternative and integrative methods to care for the patient as a whole.
Home Health Nurse
A Home Health Nurse cares for patients in their homes, helping them with tasks that they can’t do themselves due to injury or disease, and providing relief to family members who may be primary caregivers.
Hospice Nurse
A Hospice Nurse takes care of terminally ill or injured patients at the end of their lives.
Legal Nurse Consultant
A Legal Nurse Consultant works as a medical expert in legal cases, helping lawyers understand medical technology and healthcare related topics.
Nurse Life Care Planner
A Nurse Life Care Planner helps create long-term care plans for patients who need medical care for the rest of their lives due to a serious injury or chronic illness.
Nurse Writer, Author, or Historian
A Nurse Writer, Author or Historian writes and contributes to educational materials, articles, historical books, even television or movie scripts about nursing.
Occupational Health Nurse
An Occupational Health Nurse is charged with protecting the safety and health of people who work in hospitals, businesses, and other organizations.
Parish Nurse
A Parish or Faith Community Nurse cares for patients within their religious community.
Poison Information Specialist
A Poison Information Specialist is a further specialized Toxicology Nurse, trained to help people who have accidently ingested poison or are looking for information on poison.
Public Health Nurse
A Public Health Nurse promotes and protects the health of people within a community.
Rural Nurse
A Rural Nurse helps patients living in geographically and culturally isolated areas, who may have limited access to healthcare.
Telephone Triage Nurse
A Telephone Triage or Telehealth Nurse helps patients over the phone or via video chat.
Explore These In-Demand Nursing Specialties
  • Circulating nurse at work during surgery at Bon Secours – St. Mary’s Hospital
    High Demand
    Perioperative nursing—also referred to as operating room (OR) or surgical nursing—specializes in patient care before, during, and after surgical and invasive procedures. Find out more about nursing career opportunities within this specialty here.
  • Woman in scrubs an hairnet about to receive anesthetics
    High Demand
    Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists are crucial members of any surgical care team. As a CRNA, you’re responsible for bringing stellar communication skills, quality patient care, and a high level of scientific skill to each of your cases, likely to range across all disciplines.
  • Female nurse holding a newborn baby
    High Demand
    As a Labor and Delivery (L&D) Nurse, you’ll help care for mothers and newborns before, during, and after the birth. Your patients will look to you for information, reassurance and guidance in handling a delicate new life, new family member, and entirely new experience.

Take our quiz to see what nursing specialty is a good match for you.

Our Commitment to Nurses

Johnson & Johnson is a proud champion of nurses.


Where would the world be without nurses? They are innovators, lifesavers, and fierce patient advocates. That’s why Johnson & Johnson has proudly championed nurses for 125 years